Top 10 Treasures of Europe

Treasures Of Europe

Treasures of Europe  are

Street art (Berlin)

streetart

The Berlin Wall was the largest canvas in the world. This wall was open to everyone there were no restrictions on what artists could put on the wall.  The Berlin Wall was constructed in 1961 to separate Germany and Berlin during the Cold War. The wall was on the “death strip”. The term ‘street art’ is done, over,” said Mr. von Lanzenauer, pointing at Stefan Strumbel’s neon-kitsch cuckoo clocks and prints on the gallery’s walls. “I call this contemporary art. Street is just a medium.”

This is the place for people to express their opinions, especially on their preferences and dislikes from all the countries. In the 1980s, the wall was reconstructed and made 14 feet tall a place where tourists would go and admire the artwork. The West Berlin side of the wall had artwork completely covering the wall, while the East Berlin side was kept blank.

Over the past 30 years since the collection of artwork was started, much of the controversial artwork has been removed from the wall. Almost all of the wall has been removed and it only exists in places such as Potsdamer Platz, Mühlenstrasse, and Bernauer Strasse. Since the 1990s, Painting had been prohibited on the east side of the wall during the Cold War, so not a lot of new art has been added

Chocolate (Brussels)

choclates

Europe served half of the chocolates to the world and Belgium shares the income. While Brussels, the country’s capital, is home to hundreds of chocolatiers, what makes a visit imperative, at least from a chocophile’s perspective, is the rich heritage of artisanal chocolate-makers. This have their standard qualities and different flavours.

They sourcing top-quality ingredients and eschewing preservatives and unnatural additives of the dozens of caramel, marzipan, mousse, ganache and cream-filled bonbons that are stacked in neat rows down a long central counter, along with glass bowls of hand-rolled truffles, flaked with almonds and dusted in powdered sugar.

Brussels will be as if you have discovered secret treasures of the chocolate capital.

Silk (Florence)

silk

In the small lane of San Frediano district of Florence, the sole remaining artisan silk workshop in the city. In 1786 after the floods and wars they started the small silk factory.

The art of silk-making in Florence flourished in the Renaissance, when noble families amassed fortunes and fame by producing exquisite silks. That tradition endures at Antico Setificio Fiorentino, where silks are woven by hand on antique looms using Renaissance patterns.

Many kinds of productions are made with much varieties and designs. Making

Mr. Bonas said, “To make these kinds of fabric, we cannot use the modern machines,” pulling out a roll of sumptuous blue embroidered silk velvet made with 350,000 stitches per meter. And because the small factory employs only 20 artisans, production is predictably limited and costly. Decorative pillows are adorned with hand-woven trims. And, on a table, a basket is filled with sachets made of Ermisino, a shimmering silk taffeta that dates back 500years

Scent (Istanbul)

scent

Functioning of factory passages and taste buds are essential for appreciating the exotic scents and sweets stacked in glass cases and on black lacquer shelves around this boutique on the European side of the city, which sits astride two continents. Don’t visit Lokum Istanbul if you have a cold. Scents contain the Turkish essences like rose, fig, tea and mimosa.

Scents transforms some of those same ingredients like rose, fig and others lemon, pistachio, walnut. Scents with a hard candy in flavors like rose, fig, bergamot and cinnamon.

Tiles (Lisbon)

tiles

In Lisbon, Thousands of specimens, from the 15th century to the 1930s, fill Solar a nearly 60-year-old Lisbon tile specialist and antique dealer. And all across Portugal, the typically blue designs of azulejos, ceramic tiles are spread across churches, monasteries, castles, palaces, university halls, parks, train stations, hotel lobbies and apartment facades. The result is an embellished land of Christian saints, biblical episodes, Portuguese kings, historical glories, pastoral idylls, aristocrats at leisure, landscapes, seascapes, floral designs and, above all, geometric motifs.

Stacks of tiles and hanging panels embody historical styles such as Hispano-Moorish, Renaissance, Baroque, neo-Classical, Art Nouveau and Art Deco. Blue and white are the star colours, though yellow, green, brown and other hues sometimes play supporting roles.

A dazzling neo-Moorish geometric pattern explodes in a kaleidoscope of blue, white, emerald and caramel shapes across four tiles. Many collections of tiles were in Lisbon.

Hats (London)

hats

In the tiny lane the Mrs Trevor-Morgan was surrounded by hats of all shapes (wide-brimmed, pillbox, beret, fascinators), in materials like silk taffeta, wool hound’s-tooth, velour felt, straw and lace. Embellishments included peacock or spiky feathers, silk flowers or sheer veils, bows or curls.

She who has designed some 65 hats for Queen Elizabeth over the last decade and creates bespoke hats for all occasions. She recommends clients make a one-hour appointment and bring along the outfit for a particular event so she can match the color. Here the hats are so trendy and fashionable.

Everyone want to wear a hat, it automatically makes you more interesting and a hat can completely change the personality of the wearer.

Guitars (Madrid)

guitars

Madrid’s storied guitar makers’ workshops can feel like stepping into the past while crossing them. Curly wood shavings, from the palest pine to ebony, cascade to the floor as artisans hone a few humble planks into acoustic works of art. It’s painstaking work all done by hand with classical guitar models and the methods of making them changing little over the last century. The monthly production of even the most seasoned craftsmen typically maxes out at two instruments per month.

The finished products will someday go out the door, gleaming with varnish and polished metal fittings, to seduce audiences from stages around the globe. The door is usually open at Mariano Conde’s, a tiny two-level workshop near the Teatro Realm. Guitar’s colourful mix of woods is less an aesthetic choice than a science. Each element of the instrument’s anatomy has specific physical and acoustic demands, and its maker knows which woods can accomplish each function.

Umbrellas (Paris)

umbrellas

Here a cluster of handmade umbrellas be found. Using both modern and centuries-old machines and tools, the shop’s wares. Fine and rare woods form the shafts. Handles range from sewn leather to engraved silver to carved wood inlaid with horn or jewels. Linen, cotton or silk all treated to be impermeable to water and ultraviolet rays are cut and sewn into the canopies, which might be adorned with lace, ribbon, embroidery or even ostrich feathers. The umbrellas with slim, straight beech wood stem and handle allow for easy twirling.

Toys (Prague)

toys

This is to impress the children by the traditional toysThe inside seems less like a toy store and more like a toy closet: a single small room overstuffed with beautiful, long-haired Hamiro and boxes of Merkur metal construction. Inside one display case is an impressively realistic layout of Merkur’s O-scale model trains, on top of which are unusual stuffed animals, like the three-foot-high giraffe and packs of simple wooden toys with wheels and pull strings. Everything seems quirky and fun, and often remarkably affordable.

More important, almost everything has a real connection to the Czech lands. When you start playing with the old-fashioned wind-up metal toys, you will probably fall in love with the tiny version of the country’s classic Zetor tractor, complete with working forward and reverse gears as well as optional attachable hay wagons, cisterns, seeders and tillers. In terms of entertainment, such historic toys probably don’t have much on Candy Crush Saga.

Coffee Sets (Sarajevo)

coffee

To know Sarajevo, you must understand the importance of coffee. Making traditional coffee introduced here soon after the Ottoman Grounds are roasted, before adding boiling water. When the froth foams to the top, the rich brew is poured into a small, handle less china cup known as a fildzan which sits in a copper sheath, or zarf. The world grinds to a halt. Cigarettes are lit. Conversations take hushed tones.

But a trained ear can make out craftsmen coaxing copper into vessels used for preparing and drinking Sarajevo’s beloved beverage. They removes the lead and sanitizes the dzezva before applying a stove-ready tin lining. For others, he’ll apply a coat of tin outside and in, and engrave through to the under layer of copper in geometric patterns.

A coffee must take at least half an hour just to sit and enjoy.

 

National libraries of Europe

National libraries of Europe

The libraries are an impressive representation of European cultural heritage throughout the centuries with short descriptions have been added to provide essential information. This treasures exhibited in this online exhibition come from national libraries from all over Europe, going back as far as the 8th century. These libraries have selected some of the most stunning artefacts in their collections, like rare and precious books, illuminated manuscripts, bookbinding’s, drawings, prints and decorated papers.

Deepika@ swot
[email protected] swot
I enjoy planking, jigsaw puzzles and duck herding. I am generous and loveable

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